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Author Topic: Switch or stick?  (Read 1367 times)

Micheál O'D

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Switch or stick?
« on: 09, June, 2020, 04:27:39 PM »
Hi all


About a year ago I got decided to try MTB and I bought a new Vitus Escarpe 2019 29" VR.
It was a lot of money for me at the time (~€1800) as I wasn't sure whether I would keep up this MTB thing or not.
Fast forward 1 year I realise this was money extremely well spent as I have used the bike a lot, absolutely love MTB and love the bike also.


I realise that some of the components on the bike could be considered entry level etc. but I don't feel the bike is holding me back in anyway at all.


However I do understand the punishment that MTB bikes are put through and there is a train of thought that you should upgrade bike pretty often.


What are peoples opinons on this? Should I just ride the bike until it falls apart (5-6 years probably) while trying to maintain it?


Or should I consider selling it now while it is in good nick and upgrading to something else? What extra would I get from a bike in the €2k-€3k bracket?


Thanks for any opinions in advance?
Micheál






krezi

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Re: Switch or stick?
« Reply #1 on: 09, June, 2020, 05:15:38 PM »
Hey Micheal,

Great stuff on enjoying MTB. It's a great sport and there is so much variety.

Personally I think that you should keep the bike and just upgrade components as they fail if you're enjoying the bike and it suits your riding style and type of terrain you want to tackle. There is no point changing a bike just for the sake of it. Second hand bikes fetch so little money that I would keep the bike. These days all bikes have progressive modern geometry and it's been around for a couple of years now so I doubt you're missing anything as far as your current bike goes.

If you decide you want to do a different type of riding maybe XC racing or enduro just for argument sake and your bike is not 100% suitable for it then I would look into adding a bike. This way it will give you various options depending on what type of riding you want to do in a day etc and also you spread usage over two bikes which means less maintenance. That's the way I look into it

Chat soon
Pawel


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Re: Switch or stick?
« Reply #2 on: 09, June, 2020, 05:59:18 PM »
I agree with Pawel.  I had my last bike for five years before buying a new steed last year.  Keep the bike - keep it serviced regularly - wheel & suspension bearings, and the suspension itself.

If you want to look at component upgrades, start with the contact points - pedals, saddle and grips, maybe bars.  Then look at brakes and wheels. All these can make a difference to how you control the bike and how it rides.

saccades

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Re: Switch or stick?
« Reply #3 on: 09, June, 2020, 06:48:05 PM »

 :o

Don't listen to them.


The formula is N+1 where N is how many bikes you currently own.


Any other advice is heretical and should not be listened to.

Micheál O'D

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Re: Switch or stick?
« Reply #4 on: 10, June, 2020, 10:49:30 AM »
Hey Micheal,

Great stuff on enjoying MTB. It's a great sport and there is so much variety.

Personally I think that you should keep the bike and just upgrade components as they fail if you're enjoying the bike and it suits your riding style and type of terrain you want to tackle. There is no point changing a bike just for the sake of it. Second hand bikes fetch so little money that I would keep the bike. These days all bikes have progressive modern geometry and it's been around for a couple of years now so I doubt you're missing anything as far as your current bike goes.

If you decide you want to do a different type of riding maybe XC racing or enduro just for argument sake and your bike is not 100% suitable for it then I would look into adding a bike. This way it will give you various options depending on what type of riding you want to do in a day etc and also you spread usage over two bikes which means less maintenance. That's the way I look into it

Chat soon
Pawel


Thanks Pawel.
Some good advice there and I like the idea of eventually spreading usage over a couple of bikes!

Micheál O'D

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Re: Switch or stick?
« Reply #5 on: 10, June, 2020, 10:50:47 AM »
I agree with Pawel.  I had my last bike for five years before buying a new steed last year.  Keep the bike - keep it serviced regularly - wheel & suspension bearings, and the suspension itself.

If you want to look at component upgrades, start with the contact points - pedals, saddle and grips, maybe bars.  Then look at brakes and wheels. All these can make a difference to how you control the bike and how it rides.


Thanks Steve
Again some good advice. I'll think about those suggested upgrades as they seem very doable!

Micheál O'D

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Re: Switch or stick?
« Reply #6 on: 10, June, 2020, 10:52:16 AM »

 :o

Don't listen to them.


The formula is N+1 where N is how many bikes you currently own.


Any other advice is heretical and should not be listened to.


Saccades - this is so true but no matter how many times I tell my wife she doesn't seem to understand!


I think she's got a problem!

DerMot

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Re: Switch or stick?
« Reply #7 on: 10, June, 2020, 12:44:42 PM »
I agree with Pawel.  I had my last bike for five years before buying a new steed last year.  Keep the bike - keep it serviced regularly - wheel & suspension bearings, and the suspension itself.

If you want to look at component upgrades, start with the contact points - pedals, saddle and grips, maybe bars.  Then look at brakes and wheels. All these can make a difference to how you control the bike and how it rides.


Tyres would also make a great difference.  More aggressive one if your heading off piste is helpful when it gets mucky.  Also go tubeless if you haven't, defo!!  Get a dropper if you don't have one.  There's plenty of options to spend (little, but some) and the bike will be much better for it and you enjoyment too.




Second bike does mean you can bring out a mate or misses if you wanted to, plus your never stuck for a bike when one breaks, unless you go out the next day and break something on the second one.

RobH

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Re: Switch or stick?
« Reply #8 on: 10, June, 2020, 01:56:20 PM »
I'd take whatever route to have 2 bikes. Keep the existing bike and ride it until you've saved or feel the need to really upgrade. There's nothing worse than being off the bike for a week or two because it's getting fixed.

Hywel

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Re: Switch or stick?
« Reply #9 on: 10, June, 2020, 02:11:43 PM »
Yep, what they said!
4 to 5 years for a bike is a good reference (unless you race a lot and really punish your bike). Enjoy your bike until you feel it is holding you back.

For most brands the frame is the same from the cheapest to most expensive builds (except for carbon vs alloy options), so upgrade the components as you wear them out. Also, don't feel like you have to get top of the range components - for example, current shimano slx is higher spec than the xt components were just 4 years ago (and they were great).
 
Add the tyres to the contact points list that Steve posted, along with upgrading to tubeless (if not already set up).

Micheál O'D

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Re: Switch or stick?
« Reply #10 on: 10, June, 2020, 10:45:34 PM »
Thanks lads.


This has been really useful.


I now have a plan of action - keep bike, enjoy it. Maintain it as best I can, upgrade some of the components as others fade out and start saving for a second bike which I can use to share duties, use if the other is out of action or lend to a friend.


ps. I've gone tubeless - really worth doing alright


pps. I have a dropper post also - this is the best piece of kit! So handy! Biggest game changer since I last rode MTB about 10 years ago.


In general I feel that bikes have come on hugely in that 10 year period - full suss bikes are much better and the geometry is super fun

 

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