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Author Topic: Routing Cables on an External Dropper Seatpost  (Read 274 times)

DoeZer

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Routing Cables on an External Dropper Seatpost
« on: 16, April, 2018, 08:56:16 AM »
I have a Reverb External Route Dropper Post.


They get good reviews online and Rockshox is a good brand so i found a good deal on adverts and went for it.


Big regret!  because i didnt realise at the time that it actuates from the saddle!  What that means is the hydraulic hose runs all the way up to the saddle
which means when you drop the saddle down you are left with a big loop of cable which you need to try and manage so that it doesnt touch off any moving parts,
or snag in branches or whatever the hell can happen....


Other droppers,  for example the Brand-X one that Chain Reaction also sells.. the cable runs only up as far as the seat clamp, so it doesnt change length ever!
That is a MASSIVE difference!  and so much better!  In fact Im amazed any dropper is made the other way. 


Anyone else come across this problem with externally routed droppers!!??


thanks
D

DerMot

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Re: Routing Cables on an External Dropper Seatpost
« Reply #1 on: 16, April, 2018, 11:45:29 AM »
Make sure you use teh do da that attaches to the seat post that it routes through.  D shaped object.  Mines a mess to but heh/=.  I even had to remove a frame fastner for the cable after the fastner caught my knee more than once.  Cable ties for the win!!

DoeZer

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Re: Routing Cables on an External Dropper Seatpost
« Reply #2 on: 16, April, 2018, 11:53:51 AM »
Thanks.  yes im using that but my bike doesnt have cable run points so theres cable ties everywhere.


i run it under the bottom tube and up to the handlebars,   because if i go the top tube route then i need to cut it , bleed it and re-set it etc.


So i cable tie it completely, its fully fixed from the handlebars back to the bottom of the seat tube.  then the slack loop has to happen in between the seat tube and the saddle.  and therein lies the problem, because it keeps rubbing off the suspension.   its a hydraulic hose,  so you cant have it rubbing off anything because it will wear and then leak...


its just very fiddly design.  i see other seatposts that actuate from the bottom.  so the hose attaches down where the seat clamp is.
that means you dont get any cable slack,  it stays exactly the same.  much mucgh better design IMO... maybe theres a good reason for the attachment point up at the saddle but i cant see one to be honest..  !!! ::)

Stephen McMullan

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Re: Routing Cables on an External Dropper Seatpost
« Reply #3 on: 16, April, 2018, 12:22:04 PM »
Lots of frames that don't take internal routing although I guess most/all new frames do?

As DerMot says its all about the routing. Don't cable tie anything too tight - that'll be the pinch point and the loop will develop from that point back to the seat

 

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